News

It’s time once again for the “oh wait, I’ve been working on everyone else’s projects what about my own website I should really do something about that” redesign. Please bear with me as some links may need to be re-set.

Thanks to a fun year of health issues, from bilateral hand arthritis to glaucoma to chronic migraines and finally getting to experience my first biopsy sans sedation (0 stars, do not recommend), I have been a little preoccupied. It hasn’t been all bad; even the “bad” has provided some great comedy material.  I presented for the first time on a panel at Seattle’s GeekGirl Con in 2018 and ran for office. The latter did not go as planned, but it allowed me to address my concerns regarding equity and access in Pierce County. I also left a three-year long career in vocational rehabilitation services, and I’m figuring out next steps.

Fortunately, I have several projects in the work. I am still heavily involved in my community. I have been focused on helping Tacoma’s South End Neighborhood Council undergo some overdue changes in term of outreach, website, social media, and neighborhood engagement. I’m currently working on a historical research project, which will be presented at Tacoma artist Lynn Di Nino’s April 2019 Tripod Series. I’m getting caught up on editing and uploading photos from the past year. And as I have received several requests to help on various political and social justice campaigns, I am once again offering my services as a paid consultant. Other projects will be announced as dates and details are confirmed.

Thank you for your continued support of my work.

 

Cheers!

 

Suzanne

 

Literally, New Gear.

New Work available at No Mine! Studios Redbubble Shop.

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“Gear.” Gray. Sticker. Digital Illustration. S. Skaar.
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“Gear.” Gray. T-shirt. Digital Illustration. S. Skaar.
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“Gear.” Black. T-shirt. Digital Illustration. S. Skaar.
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“Gear.” Black on White. Totebag. Digital Illustration. S. Skaar.
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“Gear.” Black. Sticker. Digital Illustration. S. Skaar.

More color combos coming soon.

Cheers!

Suzanne

No Mine! Studios

Happy New Year.

2015 was jam-packed, and did not progress at all as I predicted it would. I ran for office on a well-developed social justice platform with $150, went to Africa, learned some Swahili and Nyakusa, watched my daughter’s language and social skills blossom, made new friends, developed my shop, started the wheels turning for a new media platform, stood up for myself and others, recently began looking at new career opportunities, was made Second Vice-Chair of the City of Tacoma Human Rights Commission, and am finishing the year with pneumonia and maybe malaria, too. I’m finding lessons even in the setbacks. For example, it probably shouldn’t take fluid in the lungs to make me take a break, but it seems like I have to learn this lesson every year.

I have been inspired by many friends whose work improves communities around the globe. In addition to illustrations of dinosaurs and a flailing Moped Guy, I plan to tell somewhat more serious stories in the coming year through writing and podcasting. I’ll share links as new projects are completed. As always, if you would like to collaborate, drop me a line at nominestudios [at] hotmail [dot] com.

Thank you for your support. Best wishes to you and your loved ones for a Happy New Year. Make 2016 count.

Cheers,

Suzanne

No Mine! Studios

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Artist with daughter, Isobel. 2015. Tacoma.

Crafty Like That

For a long time, I let the imaginary divide between “real art” and “craft” steer me away from fabric arts and into painting. While I enjoy painting a lot, I’m ashamed at how old I was before realizing how inherently sexist this classification is.

The work that other artists have mastered for the sake of beautifying their homes and the lives of their families is no less challenging or “real”. I underestimated how hard it was as a new mother, and dove headfirst into sewing projects. Between grad school and a new child, I didn’t have the time or energy to master the basic steps before tackling her first Halloween costume. As Trick-or-Treaters arrived at the door, I was still trying to attach a furry green tail to the back of an unlined vest, disappointed that I wasn’t capable of doing more.

Izzy's first Halloween costume. I'm sorry, kid.
Izzy’s first Halloween costume. I’m sorry, kid.

After I graduated and no longer could depend on daycare to help out, the demands of cleaning up after a 15-month-old, cooking everything from scratch, and freaking out over typical childhood injuries pushed my artistic practice in a digital direction. {It’s a lot harder for a kid to hurt themselves using the items in Photoshop than any of the items typically found in an artist studio. My head hurts at the memory of all the aerosol I used to make “real art.”}

Thinking back on the amount of spraypaint used for this half-finished piece, I now get why I didn't finish it.
Thinking back on the amount of spraypaint used for this half-finished piece, I now get why I didn’t finish it.

By focusing on making art for public consumption versus private enjoyment, we can often lose sight of taking on even more challenging tasks. Pleasing the ever-changing tastes of a three-year-old is an excellent multi-purpose exercise: speed, flexibility, creativity, and humor come back into the artistic practice, and can only improve future projects.

With the goal of once again working for my favorite client, I picked up the needle and thread yesterday. I drew out patterns on felt, solicited input, and made something that arguably could have been bought in the cat section at Pet Smart for 1/20th of the cost in terms of labor and supplies.

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Despite its shortcomings, Isobel received it happily. She watched me while I worked to see what goes into making projects from scratch. The process is just as important as the product. I’m starting smaller and building my skills up again in a new medium, and my daughter is learning that we all have to start somewhere.